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PR internships and graduate jobs: The top tips you need to know

PR internships and graduate jobs: The top tips you need to know

The PR industry is exciting, fast-paced and always on the lookout for fresh talent.

PR has something for everyone: whether you are a creative media graduate, an English student with a flair for writing, or a sports fan with an interest in events.

Yet breaking into the PR industry can be competitive, so here are five insider tips for getting an internship or graduate job in PR.

FYA seminar

All members of the PHA team are encouraged to attend weekly training sessions. Pictured are both permanent team members and interns during a guest speaker seminar.


1 – Do your research

Graduate roles in PR pop up all the time, so making sure you pick the right one for you is vital. The best candidates will have researched the company and have a good understanding of their work.

Going into an interview you should feel confident in your ability to talk about the company’s successful campaigns and what makes them different from their competitors; all of which shows you understand the company and PR.

It’s important to remember that an interview is just as much a chance for you to find out more about the company as it is for the company to find out about you. So don’t be afraid to ask questions and engage in a discussion about the PR campaigns and events you feel passionately about.

Try to name check their clients, express an interest in their founders, and if they’ve won an industry award congratulate them on this – all this knowledge will add personality to your interview and make it memorable.


2 – Tailor your CV

Your CV is the first look at your professional skills and creative experience that an employer gets, so make sure it’s a good one.

Start your CV with a punchy personal summary that both grabs their attention and clearly says what you’re looking for. Try to present your experience in a way that tells the story you want it to – so that writing for your student newspaper, getting involved with event planning and working in a shop all show you have the skills necessary to succeed in PR.

Even the skills you think may be unrelated to PR can be relevant. For example, working in retail demonstrates your ability to communicate with a variety of people and demonstrate a basic awareness of business.


3 – Keep up with social media

Social media is crucial to modern PR and so making sure you stay up to date with your own online channels will help you keep an eye on job opportunities and help recruiters keep an eye on you.

As a free and wide-reaching tool for getting in contact with prospective employees, PR companies will use Twitter as a way to reach job-hunting graduates, so follow their tweets for updates.

Be sure to keep your LinkedIn profile as up-to-date and interesting as possible, that way recruiters can easily see your skills and get in contact with work opportunities.

HR insight: recruitment fees mean PR companies are eager to contact candidates directly, so having a stand-out social media presence (LinkedIn, Twitter, WordPress) allows your skill-set to reach a much wider audience in the way that you want it to.

PHA People tweet

Check out The PHA Group’s twitter feed for live updates on recruitment and agency news.


4 – Be enthusiastic at interview

This might sound like an obvious one but it’s surprising just how far genuine enthusiasm can go in a competitive sector such as PR.

It’s refreshing for a company to meet a candidate who is eager to get stuck in and has the enthusiasm to get this attitude across at interview.

Make sure you convey a passion for the industry and a willingness to learn in the areas you are less familiar with. It’s important to emphasise that whilst you aren’t a PR expert, you have the drive to become one, and it’s this positive approach that will stand out.

So be enthusiastic about the agency, the role, the far-reaching influence of PR, and show your ability to work through the challenges that a role in PR can throw at you.


5 – Take the internship and keep in contact

If a graduate job in PR seems too daunting or out of reach, do not fear. Internships and work experience are the perfect PR taster, and whilst unpaid placements can seem unfeasible in a costly city like London, they are a great way to build up your experience and get some great names on your CV while you’re still a student.

Most PR companies will offer some kind of internship and these will vary in their content. The best PR internships out there will get you writing press releases, contributing in client brainstorms and speaking to journalists, so there’s plenty to be learnt and to add to the CV.

We here at The PHA Group champion our interns and make sure we give them as much insight as possible into PR.

But don’t despair if an internship doesn’t immediately lead to a permanent position. Employers will always appreciate a variety of experience with different PR companies. However, when your internship does finish make sure you leave the door open and stay in touch.

If you’ve made a positive impression, then why not remind them of your availability and most recent work experience by dropping them an email every now and then? That way there’s no reason why you won’t be at the front of their minds when they come to recruit for their next graduate role.

PHA social

Socialising and keeping in touch with your colleagues is a great way to network and keep your finger on the PR pulse.

What I’ve learned from a month in PR

Monday morning, Wardour Street, Soho, 8am. Not due to be in the office until 9 a.m., I was two coffees down and definitely rather anxious about my first day in the big wide working world. The first thing I learnt, however, is that the most apprehensive part about a new job is the hours leading up to it: once you’re there you barely have a chance to remember to be worried.

A month has passed since my first day at PHA and I’ve learned a lot in that period. Looking back, if I could have asked for one thing before I started it would have been some advice on what to expect, so here is my guide to anyone starting in PR.


  1. Ask questions. Lots of questions. As Voltaire said, “Judge a man by his questions rather than by his answers.” Smart man. The more you ask the more you learn, it really is that simple.


  1. Don’t expect to know everyone’s names within your first week (unless you’re in a company with ten people, in which case you probably should). During one internship I accidentally sent an email to a client instead of my colleague as I confused their names. Much embarrassment. Revisit point one.


  1. Flexibility is your friend. Firstly, no one day is the same in PR and you could plan your day down to the last second but chances are that something will crop up that throws this plan out of the window. By all means, be organised (this will help A LOT), have targets for each day, but don’t always expect plain sailing.


  1. Chances are, you may know more about the day to day workings of PR than some of your clients. This can be a bit of a blessing, the less they know the more responsibility you have and the less they might try to correct you. Of course, this also means that you need to understand exactly what you are doing for them and guide them through it step by step.


  1. Be a chameleon. Being in PR means that you have to be able to judge how you present yourself in front of certain people, and this changes from colleagues to client and from client to client. One client regularly includes ‘fo shizzle’ in her responses, some clients may not understand this down-with-the-kids talk, so probably best avoided overall.


  1. Speak your mind! At the interview you sold yourself as someone who would be able to contribute something valuable to the team, so voice your opinions and ideas. After all, you weren’t hired to sit in the background.


  1. You’ll develop a new found passion for something you have never even thought about before. Well, you will at least spend enough time writing and pitching so enthusiastically about something you’ll think you have.


  1. Very few things are ever irretrievable. Probably the most reassuring piece of advice: if something goes wrong, keep calm and ask for help, your colleagues will always be on hand to assist.

For more information about PR jobs, internships or opportunities at The PHA Group, visit our recruitment section by clicking this link or email


Image courtesy of Niuton May,