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Is this FINALLY the year Leonardo DiCaprio will achieve Oscars glory…?

Is this FINALLY the year Leonardo DiCaprio will achieve Oscars glory…?

As the 2016 Oscars loom, Leonardo DiCaprio fans will be on the edge of their seats – with memes and hashtags at the ready – anticipating whether this is THE year when the famous Titanic star will finally win an Oscar.

As the saying goes, if at first you don’t succeed, try, try and try again. This is certainly what DiCaprio has done, having missed out on winning all of the previous four Academy Awards he’s been nominated for. His performances in the likes of; ‘What’s Eating Gilbert Grape’; ‘The Aviator’; ‘Blood Diamond’ and ‘The Wolf of Wall Street’ have all earned him nominations, but sadly to no avail. The latter prompted the circulation of the hashtag ‘#GiveLeoAnOscar’ with fans appalled he once again missed out, while others created ‘memes’ poking fun at the celebrity.

Leonardo Oscar Fail Meme, Image courtesy of Brian Corder on Flickr

Leonardo Oscar Fail Meme, Image courtesy of Brian Corder

Controversially, some critics believe he is yet to win an award because he is actually yet to deserve one. Arguing as well that he has half his career still ahead of him and it is not uncommon to win these types of prestigious awards over the age of 40.

However, it appears DiCaprio has pulled out all the stops with his latest film, enduring temperatures of minus 25 degrees, (without gloves or hats as it was set in Autumn) and jumping into freezing cold waters, in the hope of securing the much sought after award. He’s truly put his heart and soul into The Revenant admitting that he’s “done everything (he) could possibly do”. With this in mind, you have to question – if putting himself through these hellish conditions doesn’t get him the Oscar, then what can!?

 The Revenant 2015 Movie, Image courtesy of Stylish HD Wallpapers on Flickr.jpg

The Revenant 2015 Movie, Image courtesy of Stylish HD Wallpapers on Flickr.jpg

Whilst playing down his disappointment, telling interviewers, he doesn’t do it in order to win awards, it seems Dicarprio may be slightly bitter; confessing that he felt some previous awards may have been given to the wrong people.

His performance in the Revenant has already won him a Golden Globe award for Best Actor, a SAG award and a barrage of industry recognition, but will 2016 be the year that Leonardo DiCaprio gets the full sweep of award victories? Let’s hope he has a Oscar-worthy ‘gracious loser’ face ready to go, just in case it isn’t fifth time lucky…

The Greek financial crisis – Twitter’s take

For the past few weeks the news agenda has been dominated by the Greek crisis and what seemed to have become the never-ending discussions by political leaders to end the stalemate. However, at the same time that the political negotiations and debates were taking place, the online world of social media was also heating up.

Social media and Twitter, in particular, are now the key channels where people express views, debate, criticise and argue, but what is even more interesting is how users use humour and creativity to address hot topics on these platforms. Major political topics and personalities are targeted through a different lens, pointing out elements that are often exaggerated and have become almost stereotypical. The aim? To give a new spin to the grim reality and in many ways to challenge ‘authority’ and emphasise its ‘weak’ points.

Interactivity and engagement are among the key perks of social media and coupled with humour and political satire, they make a powerful mixture. Hashtags like #ilovetsipras and #merkelmeme gained in popularity with users tagging caricatures and other content, while hashjacking like in the cases of #greferendum and #agreekment also inspired users to post their own version of political analysis in a humorous way.

Social media has been awash with satire throughout the crisis.

Social media has been awash with satire throughout the crisis.

Is humour people’s way of dealing with a highly stressful and uncertain situation? Politics and humour have always been different sides of the same coin. Political cartoons made their presence in the UK in newspapers as early as in the 1700s. The internet, however, has enabled the creative potential of humour to unleash and at the same time it has also made it easier for satirists to bypass censorship and stay anonymous.

What was even more interesting was that the parallel online satirical trend that followed the EU talks had no geographical limit with users across the world participating and engaging with one another and exchanging jokes, cartoons and memes. Humour creates a global communication channel and social media have made it possible for this content to enjoy a global reach they never would have had otherwise.

Coverage of the issue has been mixed to say the least.

Coverage of the issue has been mixed to say the least.

What the recent example of the EU talks on the Greek crisis shows is that humour is a fantastic way to create virtual community bonds among users that would potentially have never interacted otherwise. It is also a great shock absorber helping people to make sense of reality and look at things in a more positive way. It is clear that the social media frenzy over the Greek crisis will continue in the weeks and months to come.

After all political satire was a Greek invention.

The Greek financial crisis – Twitter's take

For the past few weeks the news agenda has been dominated by the Greek crisis and what seemed to have become the never-ending discussions by political leaders to end the stalemate. However, at the same time that the political negotiations and debates were taking place, the online world of social media was also heating up.

Social media and Twitter, in particular, are now the key channels where people express views, debate, criticise and argue, but what is even more interesting is how users use humour and creativity to address hot topics on these platforms. Major political topics and personalities are targeted through a different lens, pointing out elements that are often exaggerated and have become almost stereotypical. The aim? To give a new spin to the grim reality and in many ways to challenge ‘authority’ and emphasise its ‘weak’ points.

Interactivity and engagement are among the key perks of social media and coupled with humour and political satire, they make a powerful mixture. Hashtags like #ilovetsipras and #merkelmeme gained in popularity with users tagging caricatures and other content, while hashjacking like in the cases of #greferendum and #agreekment also inspired users to post their own version of political analysis in a humorous way.

Social media has been awash with satire throughout the crisis.

Social media has been awash with satire throughout the crisis.

Is humour people’s way of dealing with a highly stressful and uncertain situation? Politics and humour have always been different sides of the same coin. Political cartoons made their presence in the UK in newspapers as early as in the 1700s. The internet, however, has enabled the creative potential of humour to unleash and at the same time it has also made it easier for satirists to bypass censorship and stay anonymous.

What was even more interesting was that the parallel online satirical trend that followed the EU talks had no geographical limit with users across the world participating and engaging with one another and exchanging jokes, cartoons and memes. Humour creates a global communication channel and social media have made it possible for this content to enjoy a global reach they never would have had otherwise.

Coverage of the issue has been mixed to say the least.

Coverage of the issue has been mixed to say the least.

What the recent example of the EU talks on the Greek crisis show is that humour is a fantastic way to create virtual community bonds among users that would potentially have never interacted otherwise. It is also a great shock absorber helping people to make sense of reality and look at things in a more positive way. It is clear that the social media frenzy over the Greek crisis will continue in the weeks and months to come.

After all political satire was a Greek invention.