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Top 5 Christmas Consumer PR Campaigns

Top 5 Christmas Consumer PR Campaigns

With the festive season upon us, it’s time to look back at some of the best Christmas campaigns from over the years. As we all know, as soon as December hits, people switch into panic mode over presents, cooking and festive

Photo by freestocks.org on Unsplash

decorations. Brands capitalise, hoping to engage and excite customers with their festive campaigns. A report published by National Building Society stated that £77.6bn was spent last Christmas. Brands are willing to spend millions each year on their Christmas campaigns, hoping to secure a healthy return on investment.

So, without further ado; here are our top five Christmas consumer campaigns

  • Coca-Cola

Red trucks swiftly moving through a snowy landscape, lighting up towns as they go. Such a simple idea but an idea which has stayed in the minds of consumers all around the world for years. The iconic ‘Holidays are coming’ advert, launched back in 1995. For many people the festive season doesn’t start until they see the Coca-Cola advert, that’s quite an impression to have over consumers.

The Coca-Cola Christmas truck tour is also back this year, to hand out free goodies to fans up and down the UK. The hashtag #holidaysarecoming has already amassed 330,000 posts on Instagram. Coca-Cola has shown that its brand can adapt from the 1920’s to almost 100 years later ever evolving with new trends and apply them to their marketing strategies.

  • John Lewis

Over the last ten years, John Lewis Christmas campaigns have become a staple part of our festive season. Never afraid to splash the cash, with the first Christmas campaign in the John Lewis collection costing £6m. By creating popular and memorable campaigns it has had a direct influence on sales. The long wait campaign in 2011 reached half a million views in its first 24 hours. That Christmas saw sales up 9.3% year on year in the five weeks prior to December.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSLOnR1s74o&t=2s

The following year saw an even bigger upsurge in sales, with a massive 44.3% increase thanks to the snowpeople in love campaign which helped John Lewis break into the £800m mark in sales.

  • Sainsburys

Not known traditionally for their Christmas campaigns or in the league as Coca-Cola or John Lewis, but Christmas 2014 was Sainsbury’s year. Inspired by teaming up with the Royal British Legion they retold the story of the Christmas day football match. The almost four-minute-long campaign recreates one of the most famous moments of the first world war.

The supermarket shows the tale of the Christmas day peace in the trenches, a moving and very human story focused on the infamous football match in no man’s land. A young British solider passes on a chocolate gift to his German equal, which then leads to the end message ‘Christmas is for sharing’.

All proceeds that were made from the £1 chocolate bar advertised in the campaign, were donated to the Royal British Legion.

Another hit produced from Sainsbury’s which exceeded all expectations is ‘Mog’s Christmas Calamity’, the 2015 campaign reached over 38 million views on YouTube. With many claiming that Sainsbury’s campaign blew John Lewis’s out of the water for 2015.

  • McDonalds

McDonald’s has been picking up momentum each year with their creative campaigns. In 2017 they’ve created the #ReindeerReady campaign.

The brand tells the story of a young girl on a shopping trip with her father who is saving a McDonald’s carrot stick to give to Santa’s reindeer. But when they return home, her sibling points out that one carrot won’t feed Santa’s army of reindeers, and so they travel back to McDonald’s to get more carrot sticks.

The fast-food brand is hoping similar success to last year, which delivered an increase in sales and brand awareness.

Emily Somers, VP of marketing and food development at McDonald’s goes on to say “We’ve been selling carrot sticks for more than 10 years in our restaurants, it’s something we’ve always done. And it’s absolutely on point with the [wider] message around Christmas”.

  • Heathrow

The nations favourite teddy bears return to our screen this Christmas for part two of Heathrow’s Christmas campaign. Last Christmas we were introduced to Doris and Edward Bair. The campaign tracks two bears as they land at Heathrow airport, go through passport control and walk through arrivals, waiting patiently for someone to claim them. At the end of the commercial the Bair’s transform into elderly adults and it shows that they have been greeted by their grandchildren.

This year it takes a more detailed look at the Bair’s life together with the motto ‘Fly to someone, not just somewhere’

 

 

Lily Allen: She’s Back And She Means Business

Image Courtesy of ThePrettyHelpless, flickr.com

Image Courtesy of ThePrettyHelpless, flickr.com

She’s back. Holding the trophy as one of the nations much loved, and much-missed singer phenomenons: Lily Allen has made her ultimate comeback to the music industry.

Vowing to never return to the industry four years ago, her eagerness for a ‘normal’ life proved less than exciting  “I wasn’t good at staying at home all day, it didn’t suit me” she explained, “I’m creative, it’s just who I am.. I missed the positive feedback about my music from my fans. I missed the rush of performing. I missed the free clothes and handbags and the good tables in posh restaurants. I did!.”

In terms of PR, Allen’s comeback has been a strategic success. Media savvy, over the last year she has teased us with small features in chart songs and Christmas adverts (we all remember the John Lewis ad), making her return a gradual process. So it wasn’t a surprise when she announced she was releasing her third album ‘Sheezus’. Her lyrics, avant –Lily, are still the opinionated, controversial songs we all know and love her for. It’s clear that the smart thinking Allen knows how to gain media coverage and exposure when it comes to gossip – her recent Twitter banter with models over one of her tracks ‘Insincerely You’, she is well aware that her songs gain the attention of the media…

Her decision to cut ties with the music industry and instead become a full-time mother, wife and fashion entrepreneur, was risky. In hindsight, she is one of the few celebs willingly to choose to fade into the background of showbiz, eager to reverse her high status back to ‘human’. With the power of PR however, her face began to appear more frequently; landing fashion events, interviews, track features and magazine covers, which have all worked in her favour of regaining her lost stardom.

Has Allen made it seem that in fact, you can have it all? Indeed it seems so. Not only has she come back into spotlight seamlessly, she has also been able to keep up being a loving wife and mother of two. She has become even more of an admiral and inspirational icon to the public than ever before. Her fearless and courageous temperament has shown to us all, that you can relinquish anything.

 

Lily Allen: She's Back And She Means Business

Image Courtesy of ThePrettyHelpless, flickr.com

Image Courtesy of ThePrettyHelpless, flickr.com

She’s back. Holding the trophy as one of the nations much loved, and much missed singer phenomenons: Lily Allen has made her ultimate comeback to the music industry.

Vowing to never return to the industry four years ago, her eagerness for a ‘normal’ life proved less than exciting  “I wasn’t good at staying at home all day, it didn’t suit me” she explained, “I’m creative, it’s just who I am.. I missed the positive feedback about my music from my fans. I missed the rush of performing. I missed the free clothes and handbags and the good tables in posh restaurants. I did!.”

In terms of PR, Allen’s comeback has been a strategic success. Media savvy, over the last year she has teased us with small features in chart songs and Christmas adverts (we all remember the John Lewis ad), making her return a gradual process. So it wasn’t a surprise when she announced she was releasing her third album ‘Sheezus’. Her lyrics, avant –Lily, are still the opinionated, controversial songs we all know and love her for. It’s clear that the smart thinking Allen knows how to gain media coverage and exposure when it comes to gossip – her recent Twitter banter with models over one of her tracks ‘Insincerely You’, she is well aware that her songs gain attention of media….

Her decision to cut ties with the music industry and instead become a full-time mother, wife and fashion entrepreneur, was risky. In hindsight, she is one of the few celebs willingly to choose to fade into the background of showbiz, eager to reverse her high status back to ‘human’. With the power of PR however, her face began to appear more frequently; landing fashion events, interviews, track features and magazine covers, which have all worked in her favour of regaining her lost stardom.

Has Allen made it seem that in fact, you can have it all? Indeed it seems so. Not only has she come back into spotlight seamlessly, she has also been able to keep up being a loving wife and mother of two. She has become even more of an admiral and inspirational icon to the public than ever before. Her fearless and courageous temperament has shown to us all, that you can relinquish anything.

 

Public Relations is for life, not just Christmas…

Christmas an important time for PR

‘Image courtesy of FutUndBeidl on Flickr’

So this is Christmas. It is finally here, although it does seem like it has been with us for weeks now.

We had that John Lewis advert, which sparked excited conversation in countless homes and offices across the UK.

John Lewis’ many rivals followed, and they all came along weeks before what we now call Black Friday, a Thanksgiving-related sale extravaganza imported from the US. This was hotly followed by Cyber Monday, an internet retail bonanza a full 23 days before December 25.

These key moments, the work of marketers and advertisers and helped along by the press, shoe-horned an early Christmas in homes across the land.

But being told we are now in festive mode by advertising gurus is nothing new: Coca-Cola has been doing that for years.

Christmas ads are designed to recall lost moments of the Festive Season last felt when we were children.

Today, they are not just adverts, but beautiful mini-movies which are also multi-channel ‘experiences’ to spark debate on Facebook, Twitter and across the web.

Million upon millions of pounds are pumped into them, and Newsnight recently broke down last year’s spend.

According to research, last year Tesco spent £8.4 million on its Yuletide ads. Sainsbury’s forked out £5.7 million, Morrisons £5.5 million and Waitrose ‘just’ £2.2 million.

Of these big names, the one which enjoyed the best Christmas uplift was Waitrose, with a 9.3 percent increase in sales.

Analysts and business journalists will be closely watching the performance, and it may not all be sweetness and light, despite hugely positive noises about the economy and recovery.

Stats from Markit suggest household finances have deteriorated sharply as pay rises have fallen below the cost of living, hinting that families are entering the festive period feeling anything but.

The index measures a perception of financial well-being and was at its lowest in November since April.

Clothing retailers have already been hit – last month’s unseasonal weather already dented sales in the new winter clothing lines.

The media will be all over footfall and revenue figures in the final run-in to Christmas, whipping themselves into a frenzy to write about Christmas Day online takings on Boxing Day, and more traditional Boxing Day sales the day after.

The budget end of the market – both supermarkets and clothing outlets – will again be interesting. Primark was labelled as the high street’s star performer last year. Anyone who has ducked in there to pick up one of the crazy Christmas jumpers which are all the rage again will testify how it manic it is in the stores. The Aldi and Lidl success stories should continue – reports suggest they are already experiencing very good sales this year.

But critical eyes will again be on the companies which have spent big bucks on big advertising campaigns.

And the real crunch will come in Januar when revenue figures start being unwrapped.

With the advertisers and creative long having moved onto their next project, enter the financial and corporate PRs and their teams.

They will be the ones working to deflect any the sharp lines in the business pages, and analysis from shows like Jeff Randall Tonight on Sky News, and the erudite and excellent David Buik, who is as brilliant on Twitter with his analysis as he is on TV. Work on PR strategy commenced even before the Bear and the Hare snuggled up on our screens.

Lines between advertising and PR are often blurred, but Christmas campaigns show perfectly the differences in responsibilities.

The PR challenge will be in telling their own company’s Christmas story, and with the hope the big-money adverts have drawn in the customers, making their start to 2014 a smoother one than last year.