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The Future Of The Fashion Show

The Future Of The Fashion Show

The London Fashion Week, the hottest ticket in town, is normally only experienced by a privileged few. However, it’s 2013 and Topshop has partnered with Google to launch the first interactive live streamed fashion show.

Catwalk fashion show runway london fashion week

Courtesy of Ines Hegedus-Garcia, flickr.com

A customised YouTube feed will allow live-streamed content from the red carpet and behind the scenes. Google+ will host a digital diary fronted by the models and access to stylists behind the scenes. Google Hang Outs will allow people to speak directly with the design team at Topshop HQ. The “Be the Buyer App” will enable users to get tips from buyers on how to put catwalk looks together. HD micro-cameras, worn by the likes of Cara Delevigne, will allow viewers a models eye of the catwalk. The London Oxford Street store will allow shoppers to take photos and upload images to an interactive window display. There will also be a live ‘tweet off’ where followers of @Topshop will be challenged to review the show in 140 characters or less to win VIP tickets to the next show.

Burberry set the trend in 2011 of offering fashion fans access to aspects of the shows that had not been previously available (putting live clips on YouTube and displaying backstage images via Instagram and Twitter) and it is no coincidence that the man leading the innovative runway experience, Topshop CMO Justin Cooke, is the former vice president of global communications at Burberry.

Could this collaboration change the way designers think about catwalk shows forever?! Let us know what you think.

 

The Ad That Stole The Superbowl

After Super Sunday, a lot of what people are talking about is a tweet.

“How Oreo ‘Culture-Jacked’ the Super Bowl” – The Wall Street Journal

On Sunday the power went out at the Superdome whilst the San Francisco 49ers and Baltimore Ravens battled for the right to lift the Lombardi Trophy. Oreo, as one of the Superbowl Advertisers, were listening to the twitter chatter and seized the opportunity with a spur of the moment tweet.

The tweet went viral… retweeted 10,000 times in one hour, helping them to gain nearly 8,000 followers. Their actual ad the ‘Whisper Fight‘ depicts a Cookie vs. Crème argument with two men in a library. Propelling their Instagram following to over 50,000 whilst clearly demonstrating the power of combining TV and social media marketing.

We believe the success of the tweet was due to the months prior where Oreo cultivated a following through tweeting and posting culturally relevant ads daily as well as the use of real-time advertising during the event. The reaction from the audience has left us wondering whether the tweet had an even greater pay off than Oreo’s actual Super Bowl ad, which cost $3.8 million to create, and marked the launch of their Cookie vs. Crème campaign.

We would love to hear your thoughts.

The Internet is integral to maintaining a celebrity’s profile

The Internet is integral to maintaining a celebrity’s profile – but used without judgement and it can invite the wrong kind of attention!. We very much live in a digital age of engagement where the Internet has enabled entirely new forms of social interaction and networking. For celebrities, in particular, the social impact of certain websites is clear to see and in many cases, key to their success, their outreach, the magnitude of their fan-bases. Facebook can allow celebrities to stay in touch with a pre-existing community of thousands, My Space and YouTube offer emerging musical talent and breakthrough artists a platform to spotlight their sound and Twitter offers fans a unique level of immediacy and information about what their favourite luminary is up to.

In 2013, Sofia Coppola is set to release a film entitled The Bling Ring, starring Emma Watson. It’s actually the second movie – further to the 2011 Life Time production of the same name – about one of the most compelling post-modern scandals in recent times, a scandal that is integrally linked to the celebrity dangers of revealing too much information on the Internet.

The Internet is integral to maintaining a celebrity’s profile

‘The Bling Ring’, occasionally referred to as the ‘The Burglar Bunch’, ‘The Hollywood Hills Burglar Bunch’, and the ‘Hollywood Hills Burglars’, were a group of youngsters who notoriously burglarised the homes of a number of celebrities between 2008 through to August 2009. In total, they stole circa $3 million in cash, jewellery, artwork and designer labels from the likes of Audrina Patridge, Rachel Bilson, Orlando Bloom, Miranda Kerr, Brian Austin Green, Megan Fox and Lindsay Lohan. But it was poor old Paris Hilton who endured the brunt of their thieving ways, with her house burglarized on several different occasions.

Celebrity Twitter Profile

What is most fascinating about this particular case is how the thieves identified and honed in on their prey – they used the internet to execute the bulk of their reconnaissance! They took to Twitter in order to track when their targets were out of their respective properties and even used Google Earth to cleverly work their way into the celebrity mansions!

So – let this be an important lesson to the affluent A-List! By all means, use the internet to engage with your fans and maintain a pervasive digital presence. It keeps your name out there and allows you to engage with a 21st century audience. But exercise caution when it comes to the depth of information you put out there! Drawing focus to your home address, spotlighting when you’re away from your property, brazenly uploading pics of your brand new Louis Vuitton tote bag…all not a very good idea! There’s certainly a great risk involved when you make yourself too available and too accessible on the world wide web. The tools can be used against you!

Cover image courtesy of friskytuna, flickr.com

The consequences of an ‘indecent’ Tweet

Image Courtesy of Twitter, flickr.com

Image Courtesy of Twitter, flickr.com

When will the rich and famous learn to watch what they tweet?

 With over 500 million active users, Twitter has been deemed the SMS of the Internet. It is one of the only social networks to give those in the public eye a voice, which can be detrimental to their social statuses, as seen with Joey Barton, Melanie Sykes and Tulisa Contostavlos.

 As a result of incompetent Twitter activity, this year we have already witnessed politicians publicly apologise, footballers taken to court and celebrity love scandals exposed.

But it’s all fun and games until someone gets hurt….

This weekend Andrew Lloyd Webber slammed contestant Nathan James for his ‘Twitter ego’ and kicked him off the show.

The ITV1 contest is searching for the lead role in musical Jesus Christ Superstar. The 23 year old started the show very well with impressive performances and charismatic interviews but Lloyd Webber criticised him and his incessant tweeting: ‘Nathan, your voice is amazing but I think you need to love the song more than you love yourself.’

Nathan tweeted a picture of himself as Jesus, wearing a crown of thorns. Dawn French, a judge on the panel, quipped that he might be suited to the role of Judas.

As a result of his arrogant tweeting, Lloyd Webber opted to send Nathan home packing, despite his imposing performances. The crowd was in full agreement with the decision, which goes to show that personality can override talent.

I’m sure Nathan is kicking himself this week – he managed to lose himself in the flattery of Twitter and completely underestimate the consequences. Perhaps in the future, he will consider hiring some social media experts to tweet for him…